Cycnos


Asteroid 134329, Cycnos, a Jupiter Trojan, was discovered October 16, 1977 by C. J. van Houten, Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld, and Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory near Pauma Valley, California. It has a period of 11 years, 275 days.

It was named for Cycnos, who fought for Troy in the Trojan War. He was a son of Poseidon and had a body that couldn't be penetrated with a spear or sword. Achilles strangled him after Cycnos stumbled over a rock, after which he was turned into a swan. Cycnos had killed his wife Philonome after she falsely accused her stepson of raping her when he rejected her advances.

There were other Greek mythological figures named Cycnos, including a son of Apollo who alienated everyone around him until his last friend got so fed up with him that he killed him, after which he was turned into a swan; a good friend of Phaethon who dived repeatedly into the River Eridanus to try to retrieve Phaethon's body after he tried to drive the chariot of the sun and was struck dead when he lost control of it, and was turned into a swan by the gods; and a son of Ares who was building a temple to his father with the bones of strangers that he murdered until he was killed himself by Hercules, with Athena's help (she helped him drive off Ares, who came to his son's aid).

Astrologically, asteroid Cycnos seems to indicate to oppress, to bear a heavy burden, to lean on hard, to persecute, to endanger, also armor, to armor or inoculate, to find a chink in one's armor, need to not take protection for granted, to have or develop a thick skin, to push too far, swans.

The glyph for Cycnos is mine.



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