Earhart

Asteroid 3895, Earhart, was discovered on February 23, 1987 by Carolyn S. Shoemaker and Eugene M. Shoemaker at Palomar Observatory near Pauma Valley, California. It has a period of 3 years, 222 days and is 10.94 kilometers (about 6 4/5 miles) in diameter.

It was named for pioneering female aviator Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), who compiled a string of aviation firsts: first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic, as well as the first person to fly from Honolulu to California, the first to fly solo from Mexico City to New York and the first woman to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross. She is believed to have died, along with her flying partner Fred Noonan, in an attempt to fly around the world when her plane was lost near Kiribati's Nikonaroro Atoll (formerly Gardner Island) when she was trying to reach Howland Island, an American-owned speck of land in the same general area of the central Pacific Ocean south of Hawaii. Neither their bodies nor any identifiable part or possession of them or part of their plane have been recovered and theories have been circulating about the disappearance ever since. The most reasonable is that the plane ran out of fuel and crashed in the ocean and that Earhart and Noonan either died in the crash or made it to Nikonaroro and then died, possibly of thirst and exposure (the atoll, which has been only intermittently populated in modern times and was never settled permanently by the Polynesian peoples who predominate in the area, has an intensely hot tropical climate and no significant fresh water). However, some maintain that Earhart was on a secret mission against the Japanese and was captured by them and executed, or that she managed to make her way back to the US and live out the rest of her life in obscurity as a homemaker under an assumed identity, or even that she was captured by marauding extraterrestrials.

Amelia Earhart


Astrologically, asteroid Earhart seems to indicate aviation, inspiration, disappearance, mysterious fate or force, stranded, drowned, new identity.



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